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Top travel locations to visit in Hong Kong and methods to fly out? Hong Kong is a fabulous travel destination. As you might guess from the name, The Peak is the high point on Hong Island. And as you’d probably surmise, it offers the best views of the city – stretching from the skyscrapers and towers of the city centre to the mountains in the New Territories. It’s accessible by the Peak Tram, which passes the city’s buildings at a dizzying incline as it travels up to 1,300 feet above sea level. To get the best possible views at the top, we suggest you head to the viewing platforms at the anvil-shaped Peak Tower. Or if you fancy a hike, take a round around the 3.5km Peak Circle Walk, where you’ll get an astonishing bird’s-eye view of the metropolis below.

If you’ve had enough of the tight confines of Hong Kong and are ready for a little exercise, try escaping to the Dragon’s Back Hike. Hong Kong’s most popular hiking trail, this hike offers spectacular views out over the ocean, Big Wave Bay, Mount Collinson, Stanley, and Shek O. It’s a pleasant change from the buzz of the big city to hear birds singing, the sound of small waterfalls, and the leaves rattling in the ocean breeze. The hike is relatively easy but be sure to start at Section 8 (bus stop To Tei Wan). From here, the walk takes you up a short distance and then is predominantly downhill with rolling sections to Big Wave Bay. Once you’ve reached Big Wave Bay, you have the option of catching a taxi or mini bus to nearby Shek O. Both areas have fantastic beaches for swimming, and Shek O has a variety of restaurants serving good seafood. Don’t forget to bring plenty of water and your bathing suit and towel on this hike. A swim to cool down followed by a fruit smoothie or ice-cream at the end of the hike is heavenly.

Stanley Market is a popular market town on the sunny south side of Hong Kong Island. With its relaxed ambience, crisp sea environs and bargain buys have made it world famous. You will find an interesting array of little shops selling silk garments, sportswear, art, Chinese costume jewellery and souvenirs. A hard morning of shopping is always nicely finished off by a sumptuous lunch at one of the many restaurants such as Murray House. The 160-year-old restored three-storey colonial building that was dismantled in 1982 and transplanted from its original site in Central to be rebuilt on the Stanley waterfront. The Jade Market, just west of Nathan Road on the junction of Kansu and Battery Streets, is where vendors sell various shades and qualities of jade, a greenish stone found in East Asia. Jade is an unique ornamental stone that can be found predominantly in East Asia and the worlds biggest trading centre for Jade is in Hong Kong. Visitors can purchase various kinds of products made out of Jade at the Jade Market. Its product line includes jade rings, jade animals and even jade statues of Buddha. Special jade souvenirs and various trinkets are an ideal piece of memory to take home with.

How to get in or out of Hong Kong? We recommend flying, with Cathay Pacific if you can as i only had nice experiences with them, here is a reason : Comfort! Although many airline seats are cramped and crowded, airlines are often more comfortable than some of the alternatives. They offer a controlled climate at a comfortable temperature and reclining seats, both of which are absent from many buses. Airplanes also generally give passengers the chance to stretch their legs during the trip and often provide free beverages. First-class and business-class accommodations include large, premium seating, high-quality complimentary meals and other amenities.

The oldest temple in Hong Kong, Man Mo dates back to 1847. Worshipers still come here to pay their respects to the literature god Man and the martial god Mo. While there are several such temples in Hong Kong, the most popular and most frequented one is at Sheung Wan. An atmospheric place, the temple is a peaceful and quiet spot, perfect for contemplation. It is well worth stopping by if you’re in the area. Walking along the Tsim Sha Tsui East Promenade is an unforgettable experience and the view of Hong Kong’s skyline is awe-inspiring to behold. While ambling along, you’ll pass the historical Clock Tower, the Hong Kong Cultural Centre and the Hong Kong Space Museum. There are various cafes and restaurants for you to stop off at. The promenade is even more special at night when the Hong Kong skyline stands out dramatically against the sky and every night at 8pm the dazzling Symphony of Lights lights up the night sky with sychronised lasers and searchlights.

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