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You must see Magdalena del Mar, Lima at least once with penthouses to rent: Not as large as the Museo de la Nacion, the National Archaeology, Anthropology, and History Museum does an excellent job of exploring the history of Peru from prehistoric times to the colonial era. The displays are well organized, and you won’t be overwhelmed by the amount of material, making it easier to understand. The variety is impressive, too, with priceless examples of ceramics, figural stone carvings, obelisks, wrapped mummies, burial tombs, jewelry, tapestries, and gold and metal work, many shown with scale models of the archeological sites. The ceramic collection features pieces, which date from 2800 BC, and among the carved obelisks are the granite Tello Obelisk and the famous Estela Raimondi. Parents should be aware that some of the ceramic figures may not be suitable for children. Included with the museum is the adjacent home, once occupied by both Jose de San Martin and Simon Bolivar.

You can find this bridge, and its surrounding park, in the Barranco district. The bridge was built in 1876 and is small and wooden, but looks rather like something found on a postcard, which is why you may run into people posing for wedding photos as you walk around. The hustle and bustle of Lima’s Chinatown is not to be missed. Start on the main walkway, which is lined with Chinese-themed benches and lampposts and is not far from the Metropolitano, Peru’s bus rapid-transit system. From there, find a chifa restaurant (Chinese-Peruvian fusion food) and enjoy a meal.

For a cultured afternoon, nothing beats checking out the old haunts of Peru’s most famous writer, Mario Vargas Llosa, whose novels such as The War of the End of the World, saw him rise to international acclaim. Having spent most of his childhood in Miraflores, the district is scattered with places that influenced his writing. Contact the Municipality to join the tour starting from Parque Kennedy, which stops via various roads and buildings that have been featured in his work. One of Lima’s most prominent landmarks, the hill of Cerro San Cristobal, rises to the northeast of downtown Lima. If you want a panoramic view of the city, this is where to go. Take a taxi or a tour bus from the Plaza de Armas (walking here isn’t particularly safe). From the top, you can see right across the city and all the way out to sea-at least on a clear day. Thick coastal fog can severely obscure the view, so pick your moment wisely, while a tour in the late afternoon allows for views enhanced by the twinkling lights of the city below.

The Magdalena Market (on the streets Galvez and Bolognesi, just west of Sucre) fills up in the evenings with young couples and families. If you’re looking for discounted clothes, shoes and movies, forget about overpriced, touristy Polvos Azules (near downtown): Magdalena’s Market is the place the locals get them. The market is open daily. The best time to go for fresh produce is in the morning, but the best time to go for people-watching and clothes shopping is in the evening when the rest of the neighborhood goes out to promenade in the market’s boulevard. Find even more pictures of this incredible ocean view penthouse on @AmazingPeruPenthouse on Facebook. Need a place to rent in Lima, Peru? Read a few more details on Amazing ocean view penthouse in Magdalena del Mar, Lima.

The Museo Larco is a must-see for travelers interested in pre-Columbian art. The private museum, founded by Rafael Larco Herrera, is located in an 18th century building that was built over a seventh century pyramid. The museum’s collections, representing 5,000 years of Peruvian history, are arranged chronologically. The museum’s total collection numbers thousands of pieces. It is especially famous for its collection of pre-Columbian erotic pottery, which includes humans performing sex acts not only with each other but with gods and the dead. Equally impressive is the Gold and Silver Gallery, which includes objects such as funeral masks and jewelry worn by priests and rulers.

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