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An awesome place : Guatemala: Here we present a description and dates of the main festivals of Guatemala, activities that you can easily include in your vacations, we are sure that will improve your experience in the Heart of the Mayan World.

Major Festivals in Guatemala : Palo Volador. Performers test out their abilities to the Palo Volador throughout the festivity of their Saint; incredibly extra tall pine poles are consecrated and set up within the plaza for that ceremony. Pole dancers climb up in pairs to the top level via platforms and ropes, and then they rotate at the end of the lines dizzyingly (and alarmingly) down in terrific swooping circles. The ceremony’s roots should lay inside the Maya traditions of Yaxche, the tree of life. The places where celebrates El Palo Volador are: July 25th in Cubulco Baja Verapaz. Cubulco is located in Baja Verapaz 196 kms from Guatemala City (3 hours). August 15th in Joyabaj Quiche: Joyabaj is located 216 kms from Guatemala City, about 70 kms away from Chichicastenango

Festival of Rabin Ajau and election of Indian Princess Tesulután in Coban. July 25th: The celebrations that occur in the location of Cobán through the Folkloric Festival of the Rabin Ajau and also the election of the Princess Tesulutlán are the single most remarkable celebrations of indigenous traditions in Guatemala. The communities of Alta Verapaz are probably less popular with regards to tourism, and yet they are probably the most charming and rich in folklore. In many of the villages in Alta Verapaz, particularly Cobán and San Pedro Carchá, the majority of the ancestral celebratory customs are conserved, especially the religious festivity of the Paabanc which is an unique traditional dance that is performed all over this area by the natives, the Kekchis, who express the perpetuation of their traditions and attires. Throughout this festivity, you’ll be able to discover and appreciate traditional meals and dances. Discover extra info on Vacations in Guatemala.

Other Guatemala attractions: The Lanquin Caves, northeast of Coban, are deep limestone caverns containing an underground river with various lagoons and unique rock formations. Visitors can tour a portion of the cave, which has some rugged walkways and low lighting. Thousands of bats make their home here and provide an interesting spectacle as they leave in a nightly mass exodus from the cave to feed in the nearby forest. Visitors who are interested in seeing this unique site should plan to tour the cave in the late afternoon and then hang around until sunset. A religious shrine is also contained within the caves, which are considered sacred by the local indigenous people.

Located close to Antigua, Volcan Pacaya, is an active volcano, last erupting on May 27, 2010. While there are trails and hiking opportunities open to the public, this is not a site for the faint of heart and care should be given in the preparation of your visit. If you’ve got your heart set on climbing Volcan Pacaya and seeing the magnificent view it affords, plan on setting aside at least one whole day for your journey – if not more. If El Mirador piqued your passion for archeological sites, then you’ll want to add Yaxha to your Guatemala bucket list. It’s smaller than the more famous Tikal, but still the third largest Mayan ruins in Guatemala. Yaxha was the ceremonial center of the pre-Columbian Mayan kingdom. Its indigenous name translates as blue-green water, appropriate since it overlooks a lake. The northern Guatemala settlement had around 500 buildings, including 13 altars and nine temple-pyramids. Be sure to climb to the top of Temple 216 for views of the lakes and jungle. Find even more information on https://www.martsam.com/.

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